New Look K6035 navy jacket

To think that I made this back in March/ April, that just seems ages away!

This is also probably the first time I found myself making something I needed more than I wanted. I can think of a ton of much more fun things to wear, but the orchestra I was playing in at the time (not now that we moved, more on that later…) had a summer concert uniform including a navy blazer.

For the first concert I was caught out and had to borrow one, but there was a nice long gap to the next concert and I was determined to be prepared. Given I had not managed to find a navy blazer I liked at a reasonable price point from the high street stores (or indeed barely any at any price point, thanks to whimsies of the “current fashion”) and anyway, I’m supposed to be making not buying, I decided to take the plunge on the most tailored item I’ve made yet.

It’s not as if I could hide the tailoring either – if it was bad it was going to look really bad. Fortunately I had a pattern already from one of my magazine subscriptions; New Look K6035.

New Look K6035 pattern

I read through the instructions and decided I could manage it, so next challenge was finding a suitable fabric. A&M Textiles in High Wycombe came up with the goods, a nicely toned navy twill which was structured enough for the garment (with interfacing) but not too heavy bearing in mind I would be wearing this at a fair number of (hopefully sunny) outdoor concerts.

I interfaced all the necessary pieces right at the start so that I didn’t need to interrupt the sewing process. I opted for a lightweight interfacing, which worked well but in hindsight I think it could have taken a heavier weight and resulted in a slightly stiffer structure, especially in the larger areas such as the front facings.

K6035 front princess seam

Construction wise, I was pretty pleased with the princess seamed front panels which were one of the first elements to sew. I managed to get a really neat smooth curve especially with pressing over a ham. The collar was the big and messy bit, all about matching the notches and sewing to very specific points. The instructions also only mention matching dots, when in fact you also need to line up dot, notch, dot – the whole thing would have been much easier if that was more specific!

I found it particularly hard because most of the time I couldn’t see what I was trying to sew, until the later stages when I could partly turn it through and start to see the result. In fact I almost thought I’d gone wrong right at the end, when I couldn’t seem to turn through correctly – until I realized what structure I’d actually made and folded the fabric at the top of the collar. Suddenly everything fell into place!

I did fail to follow one step though – step 12, I stitched the whole edge of the upper collar/facing rather that only between the dots as instructed. This didn’t actually seem to have any negative effect though, and rather seemed to avoid some later hand-stitching of the neck seam under the facing (step 14), which struck me as a bit awkward. Maybe with a heavier fabric it would be necessary to follow the instructions due to the bulk, but in this case it was fine.

I still managed to fudge one lapel notch though, as evidenced by the photo below. But a bit of unpicking and careful 2nd attempt gave a much neater result.

fudged lapelFit wise, I cut a 16 and made only one alteration based on a rough (sleeveless) toile, which was to make a triangular dart-like adjustment of the side seam, taking in at the widest part at the underarm and grading to meet the seam at the waistline. This was to tailor the sides/back some more, as the two back pieces feature a princess seam and so a standard centre-back adjustment wasn’t possible (or as easy). As it turned out, I should have also done some work on the sleeves, as when I tried the jacket on with sleeves, they were much too big at the armhole. I was loathe to unpick the whole sleeve as I had managed quite a neat set-in, and anyway the shoulder and top of the armhole was ok. Instead I pinned out some excess fabric along the sleeve seamline in a wedge shape, with the widest part at the underarm join. I effectively sewed this as a dart, cut away some excess fabric and re-stitched the sleeve back in. It’s worked but next time I will alter the sleeve pattern piece to match. I think I could still have taken a little more from the side seams as well.

K6035 back jacket

new look K6035 jacket

If I were to make this jacket again, these would be my alterations:

– use a slightly heavier weight fabric and/or interfacing; I think this jacket works better with more structure

– recut pattern to improve fit of sleeve and side jacket seams. I was ok with this fit as the purpose of the garment meant I would be wearing it seated with arms raised (for playing the flute) most of the time and therefore a slightly more relaxed fit is ok

– add a button to the front. For the reasons above I left it open but again I think the style suits a button fastening. I may yet change the jacket to add this

– catch stitch the front facings in place. Again I may go back and fix this as I find it annoying that the front facings tend to “catch the wind” as I’m walking along. They are stitched in place at top and bottom so they can’t completely fold out, but the long edge is open and this is what causes the problem.

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