Vintage books & bags

Between Twinwood and my holiday to Cornwall I managed to pick up a few lovely vintage items recently.

The first was a wicker frame handbag from one of the stalls at Twinwood. There were several wicker bags on offer across a range of stalls, and they were all advertised as 1950s/1960s. I deliberated over several but settled on this one as being one of the best condition and also a good size & nice colour. The wicker has a good tone and the brown leather looks quite smart even though it’s a casual bag. It’ll go with a lot of different outfits.

1950s wicker bag

The bag stands on four stud feet and is constructed of a wicker box hinged at the base, with a fabric bag lining the interior. The bag closes with a leather flap & twist clasp. The flap needed some minor repair to glue the layers back together but otherwise the bag is in pretty good shape.

made in hong kong label

There is a label stitched inside which is partially cut off reads “Made in Hong Kong”. Now “made in China” doesn’t have a great reputation generally so this made me skeptical, but a similar label appeared in nearly all the bags on sale so I decided not to dwell on it. I’ve tried to do a bit of research since and it seems there was certainly a strong export trade of clothing and accessories including wicker bags from Hong Kong in the 1950s and 1960s, but that most of the cited labels have “British Colony” or similar on them, not just Hong Kong, which makes me thing this bag could actually be later eg. 1970s. Never mind, it’s still a good buy and I’m pleased with it! I finally have a vintage bag for my vintage outfits!

The second purchase and the first of two books was also from Twinwood; “The Big Book of Needlecraft” published in 1935.

big book of needlecraft

It’s a compendium for home sewing, with sections on all types of handcraft (embroidery, appliqué, cross-stitch, crochet, weaving, knitting), making clothes from lingerie to children & adult’s clothing to glove-making, household sewing such as upholstery, curtains and rugs, to toys and decorations. It had some great chapter headings such as “New Collars for Old Dresses”, “Needlework in the Kitchen” and “The Laundering of Artificial Silk”.

It has a section on “How to Use Your Sewing Machine” which might have been just an historical interest but for another recent purchase…more about that in another post (and there’s a clue in the picture above)! It has some great passages in it such as:

It is taken for granted today that every household possesses a Sewing Machine of some sort, and whatever may be urged in criticism of modern woman and her lack of domesticity (which is probably exaggerated), her interest in Needlecraft and love of making and wearing pretty things remains constant.

And when talking of choice of machine, the book devotes a good two pages to hand vs. treadle, electric models and wariness of second-hand or cheap knockoffs, but of brands it mentions only this:

We have said nothing yet as to the make of Sewing Machine to choose, but assuming that our readers have a preference for the “home-grown” article, the choice is so limited that it is difficult to go far wrong.

And of course in defence of the machine:

UNCONSIDERED TRIFLES. The domestic Sewing Machine is a very long-suffering friend and will often continue to give passably good results under most trying circumstances and even abuse at the hands of those who should know better.

This chapter also goes into just as much detail as a modern-day manual over needle weights, machine maintenance, bobbin winding, threading, tension, stitch lengths and problem solving, all accompanied by detailed and annotated diagrams.

Although it’s a reference book I can see myself reading this cover to cover!

The third and final treasure is another book, this time from Bookmark, a long-established second-hand shop in Falmouth. It’s “Modern Homes and Homemaking Illustrated” published in 1958. The illustrations are really what makes this book, it’s a fantastic and in some cases full-colour window of 1950s home decor.

1950s homes and homemaking

Chapters include “Furnishings – Present Day Trends”, “The Family Wash”, “Living Together”, “To be a Hostess” and “Getting to Know your Oven”.

Aside from the illustrations, this also has some fantastic (or horrific, depending on your sense of humour) passages that very much speak to the era. The chapter on washing machines mentions:

It is advisable to see several different models demonstrated. This can be done at large stores, and at times it is possible to arrange for a demonstration of the smaller models at home.

A home washing machine demonstration?? Whatever next. Or there is the question of domestic pets, possibly a little less amusing from a modern viewpoint:

Monkeys are extremely amusing but mischievous, tearing curtains and linen. Marmoset monkeys look like little old men and are very responsive to atmosphere. They are inclined to pine and die unless completely happy.

Or of course, relationship matters and keeping up appearances…

Quite apart from the husband being immersed in business once he is well on his way to the top, or having arrived there, there is the question of whether his wife has “kept up” with his progress. Somehow, especially if a man is wealthy, people accept a “rough diamond”, but they are apt to notice if his wife does not live up to his position in the world.

Or, in the decade when “teenagers” first became a thing, a very philosophical statement:

Teenagers these days sometimes talk of the kind of world their parents have made for them. Actually, all children should be brought up to the realization that they have to take their part in  making the world a better place to live in – it doesn’t just happen. It is a very empty life that has the pursuit – or expectation – of happiness as its only aim, and it is in his childhood that a malleable mind can be turned towards expecting something of himself, rather than of other people.

And on introductions:

Here are a few rules to memorize – Introduce the man to the woman. Introduce a younger person to an older one of the same sex or a woman to a man, if he is someone very distinguished. If you are not sure whether they are important, and both people (of the same sex) are about the same social level, it doesn’t matter who you introduce to whom.

Of course, it doesn’t matter….! Clearly social class mattered a great deal.

I could go on and on but I’m sure I will share a few more of these snippets on here and Instagram as I read through the books!

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For the love of Preloved

Ok so two more months have whizzed past since my “excuse” month of not making a #Wardrobe Challenge garment by going to a pattern fitting workshop…

Well July was a write off from the start, since I was away or busy every weekend and as yet I haven’t got good enough to be able to achieve much in the evenings. However, my weekends did include some vintage shopping. I must have spent an  hour in Beyond Retro in Brighton and came away with a playsuit, a navy and white sailor style dress which I think has to be one of my favourite buys to date, and a couple of scarves.
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I also reworked a charity shop buy (Star by Julien McDonald for Debenhams) which I wore on my trip to Rome – and felt very glamorous too! The rework involved raising the bustline and re-sewing the elastication, and I gathered the sleeves to create a nicer neckline.
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So that was July, I didn’t feel bad for not making anything. August has been a different story. I really haven’t had any excuse for not making something, other than it’s been easy not to. I did put together an outfit for Twinwood festival (next weekend woohoo!), but that was courtesy of the Collectif sale, so doesn’t really count…

Twinwood Look 1
So finally we come to the end of August (nearly) and I had a bit of a Preloved triumph. After the fitting workshop on the advice of some of the others I put up a Preloved wanted ad for a tailor’s dummy – the kind you can alter the measurements of. And just as I was forgetting I’d posted it, I got a reply last week! I went to pick it up this weekend and I’m chuffed – it’s really almost immaculate, as were some of the other items I got at the same time (house clearance) – a pressing ham and roll, pattern drafting/cutting board and fabric! You can see it modelling the sailor dress up above.

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So – next weekend is Twinwood but September will be the month I catch up on sewing – now that I have all the tools I could possibly need to fit and finish properly, there is really no excuse left…

Vinted UK – now with PayPal!

A while back I posted about trying a new selling site Depop. I’m afraid I didn’t have much luck there, it was too much of a social site. The news feed style and poor search function meant the few potential buyers weren’t seeing the items. I made one sale shortly after listing an item but I think that was pure luck.

So then I tried Vinted. Initially I’d been put off this site because of the escrow style payment system, but I read some good reviews from other bloggers that indicated good sales potential and I also read into the payment system and it seemed fairly robust.

So I decided to try it. The sales platform and search facility is much better as well as the social aspect. You can follow brands you like so your news feed shows up things you’re likely to want.

And now even better news ! They’ve linked up PayPal so payments can now be instant and as they would be on any other online store.

You can check out what I’m selling here:

http://www.vinted.co.uk/sh/my-profile/1049147-certainstyle

#TheWardrobeChallenge – Current wardrobe

So I am feeling pretty shocked right now. I just did a critical analysis on my wardrobe and took out everything that wasn’t handmade, secondhand, vintage or by an independent label. This is what I was left with:

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I honestly thought I had more secondhand than that!  Here’s the lineup from L2R:
2 x GBSB basic tunics – handmade
Pair trousers – handmade
60s inspired dress – handmade
Silver beaded dress – 2nd hand upcycled
Turquoise dress beaded neck – 2nd hand upcycled
Gold beaded bolero – upcycled
Fox print skirt – by GetCutie
40s green dress – Collectif
Rocha green top – 2nd hand
Brown trousers – 2nd hand
Purple dress – 2nd hand
White blouse – vintage, reworked

So needless to say I haven’t culled the rest of my wardrobe quite yet, else I’d look ridiculous. It does show me quite how far I need to go though.

And while I didn’t cull it all, I did ditch quite a bit for the next ebay round!

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#TheWardrobeChallenge

Ok, so over the last few weeks I’ve been mulling over some ideas, and I’ve now decided to set myself a challenge.

1) To make a garment a month from now on, until I run out of ideas/budget/wardrobe space

2) To not buy any new high street clothes unless it’s unavoidable (eg. bridesmaid dress which I don’t have the skills to make)

3) To gradually sell off pieces from my existing wardrobe that I replace or no longer wear

For quite some time now I have struggled to buy high street. Either I don’t like the fit, the style, the quality or the material, or all of the above, and that stays my hand at the till. The only new clothes in my wardrobe have been bought for me (Christmas, birthday) and although I do love and wear them, that doesn’t change my outlook.

Aside from the serious manufacturing practice ethics in play, I am also a great advocate of reuse and recycle. I genuinely love vintage fashion but even if I didn’t, I think I would be an advocate of vintage and second-hand shopping (whether that’s Brick Lane or eBay). We waste far too much as consumers and I very much disagree with “fast fashion”.

So it’s either make or buy second-hand from now on!

All of these ideals and ideas have culminated in my challenge above. I know it’s possible, but it will take determination.

I’m going to be blogging my challenge and posting youtube videos of my makes, but I’ll start out with a couple of intro posts. The next one will be on my new sewing machine, an investment that should enable me to make clothes with more finesse than my clunky Brother machine would have, and the follow-up will be a capsule summary of my current vintage / handmade wardrobe.

Wish me luck!

80s blouse reworked

On a recent trip to Leamington and Blighty Bazaar I bought two vintage tops from the sale rail for just £4 each. I’m still working on one of them, it’s a bit smaller than I thought and I’m still experimenting with ways to adapt it. The other was easier though, a white 80s blouse with pleat neck detail and double-button front.

This was oversized, so the first thing I did was put in double-point waist darts to draw in the shape.

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The second thing was that the neckline was VERY open and not really decent with work…so I’ve stitched that together, in the process giving the pleats a bit more stability.

Finally, I folded the edge of the neckline over and put in a few catch stitches. Originally I think it was meant to be worn with the collar upright and loose at the front, but I wanted more structure than that.

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Styled up for work with my favourite houndstooth skirt and a pair of pointy mint court shoes! 80s updated.

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Now selling on Depop

For many years I have been a devout eBayer, both buyer and seller. Mum and I both have regular wardrobe purges and most of our items are decent high street pieces and in mum’s case, often hardly worn. So it’s a nice little bonus on the months that I list on ebay. I have always tended to wait and take advantage of the free listing weekends, but these are becoming rarer since eBay introduced the automatic 20 free listing per month last year. Well, sorry eBay but 20 per month just don’t cut it for me, and our items are too good to let go for pennies.

So recently I’ve been hunting around for a rival. eBay has such a dominant market share you could forgive the startups for not even trying, but there are a few breaking away from the pack. I was initially attracted by Vinted but put off by the fact that your payment is held in escrow until the buyer receives the item and confirms they’re happy… too much risk there for me, I’m a fair seller but I can all too easily see how sellers could end up with no item and no money.

A few others are more designer-orientated and our wardrobe clearouts aren’t quite THAT good. So I was drawn to Depop, a fun and very social selling platform which is entirely app-based.

I’ve spent a week browsing and following and liking to get a feel for the site, and today listed my first items. The biggest hurdle was the picture format – they use Instagram-like squares which caused me a great headache as I tried to figure out how to get a decent photo showing all of my item… Finally a found a great app called #SquareDroid. You choose or take a photo and it scales it and fills out the square with either a block or gradient colour or blurred version of your photo. I started to pick block colour picking out a colour in my item, which I hope will make my photos eye-catching in the stream.

Not quite what Depop advertises as ‘upload your photo and away you go’, but with online selling the photos are crucial so a bit of time invested here should pay dividends later.

The descriptions are a basic text entry field and the use of hashtags is key, all very simple. Pick the category and size (and quantity if necessary). Set your price and postage (national and international shipping options only, anything more complex and your buyer would need to message you). Choose whether to share your listing via Facebook or Twitter, hit Publish and your item is flung out there into socialmedialand.

depop

You’ll need to download the app to get the full experience but to follow me & see what I have listed click on the Depop icon over in the sidebar –>

I’ll post again once I have some experience of selling and let you know my results.