Sew it’s summer…

Another four months have passed since I last blogged, so what have I been up to in that time?

  • I cast on a new knitting project, the Victory sweater, an actual vintage pattern from the 1940s. About to complete the front piece and then take a break for the Yarn in the City GLYC anniversary KAL (more on that later, I promise!)
  • I made another SOI 1940s tea dress, which turned out much looser fit than the first one, even though I cut the same size…mystery yet to be solved for version 3.
  • I have got a beautiful Sew Hayley Jane box every month and love being part of this club, I highly recommend them to any sewist. I’m going to try and do a review/round up post soon on that.
  • Got into fat quarter sewing, because of the SHJ boxes – I’ve made an origami bag, three headbands, an earbud pouch and have plans for some cushion covers.
  • Made a SOI kimono jacket and French seamed the whole thing.
  • Took the Closet Case Files “Sew your dream swimsuit” online course and made not one but TWO awesome swimsuits (Sophie and Bomshell) to take on holiday to Croatia next week.
  • Made a set of Carolyn Pyjamas (also CCF) in beautiful soft cottony viscose.

summer round up

And what’s next?

  • GLYC Anniversary KAL knitting project
  • SOI 1940s tea dress mark III
  • SOI Penny shirt dress
  • SOI Ultimate trousers – trying to refine fit issues with their online fitting workshop
  • Trying to use up remnants creatively with some mix-and-match projects or little cami tops
  • Finally do something with my “to refashion” pile that’s been sitting waiting for most of a year and keeps getting added to…

GBSB Swing / Circle Skirt

You know the advice that you should never buy fabric without a project in mind? I totally ignore that most of the time. There have been a few exceptions such as the navy twill for the jacket I had to make, but mostly I buy fabric because I like it. Sure, I consider the material type, the weight, the drape and what styles the print would suit, but I don’t always have a project in mind and sometimes end up using that fabric for something totally other than what I originally thought.

This fabric however, I have known exactly what do with since I bought it at March’s Spring Knitting & Stitching Show. The soft drape of the cotton, the brightly colored crazy travel novelty print….it screamed circle/swing skirt!

travel fabric

I used a pattern from my original Great British Sewing Bee book, which meant I had to download, print and piece together the pattern. Considering the way GBSB has inspired so many to take up or resume sewing, I find it disappointing that their books are so opaque on sizing. Each pattern is multi size, usually UK 8-16, but there are no guidelines on waist/bust/hip measurements for each as you would get on a paper pattern. Instead you get a diagram of the pattern pieces printed on one page of the book on a squared background, and the information that each square is 1cm. But again, no clear guidance on how to measure and judge sizing or adjustments from this.

GBSB circle skirt book

The pattern for this skirt is very simple (waistband and 2x skirt panels) and the only important measurement is really the waist. Based on the number of 1cm squares I judged that the largest size 16 was, including seam allowance and the buttonhole overlap feature, approximately 2.5 cm short of my waist measurement. This was easily added to the end of the waistband piece (/2 since it’s cut on the fold), and for the skirt it was added to the straight edge, /4 since there are two skirt pieces (front and back) cut on the fold.

GBSB circle skirt pattern adjustmentI actually cut the bottom of the skirt panel along the size 8 (shortest) line, even though I was also cutting along the size 16 (deepest) waistline. Given my short proportions though this put the finished skirt length just on the knee which is quite flattering.

Cutting was very quick, thanks in part to my new rotary cutter…more about that in another post! It definitely made cutting the long curve of the skirt less of a headache.

Sewing was also quick; sew the front and back skirts at the side seams, insert concealed side zip (I had one the right length and color!), sew waistband in half at the ends, turn and press, sew waistband to skirt, make buttonholes, hem and done!

Finishing the waistband seam was a pain. I think either the instructions are not clear enough or you need a bigger seam allowance. I sewed both raw edges of the waistband to the skirt, then I was trying to turn the raw edges under and top stitch – I had to do this on the inside rather than the outside so I had half a chance of keeping the raw edge under, there wasn’t enough spare.

What I think is supposed to happen is that you sew the front edge of the waistband to the skirt, then turn the back edge under and top stitch to enclose all seams. But the instructions didn’t describe this explicitly and I would have expected them to. Also because you have already stitched both waistband ends together, this makes lining up and accessing the front raw edge a bit tricky at the ends. The alternative is to do what I did but on a 2cm rather than 1.5 seam allowance, so that you have enough to turn under. This would make the waistband narrower but it’s quite generous as is.

Anyway, on to the most exciting bit of sewing this skirt – the buttonholes! The waistband design has an overlap of fabric across the top of the zip which fastens with two buttons. My sewing machine has an automatic buttonhole setting (in fact three styles) and came with the necessary foot. Essentially it works by you setting the button you will use into a gauge in the back of the foot. The needle is threaded in the front of the foot as normal, and you pull a stopper down from a fixed point on the machine to the left of the foot. Then you start the machine sewing (using the start/stop button rather than the foot pedal) and it sews a straight line until the stopper hits the stopper at the front of the button gauge. Then the machine sews a zig zag end, a quick line back to front until it hits the front stopper, then another line backwards to the gauge stopper, locking stitch and stops. Magic! You then use a seam ripper or snips to carefully open the buttonhole between the two lines of stitching.

buttonhole foot I did a lot of practice ones on some scrap fabric (probably more than I needed but it was fascinating me!) and then bit the bullet on the real thing. I think there must be a trick to lining up the holes perfectly parallel, I marked the start of mine but it was hard to see precisely past the machine foot so they are slightly off.

GBSB skirt buttons

Start to finish this is probably the quickest sew, considering I had to print and make up the pattern first too, everything done in less than a day.

GBSB skirt

 

New Look K6035 navy jacket

To think that I made this back in March/ April, that just seems ages away!

This is also probably the first time I found myself making something I needed more than I wanted. I can think of a ton of much more fun things to wear, but the orchestra I was playing in at the time (not now that we moved, more on that later…) had a summer concert uniform including a navy blazer.

For the first concert I was caught out and had to borrow one, but there was a nice long gap to the next concert and I was determined to be prepared. Given I had not managed to find a navy blazer I liked at a reasonable price point from the high street stores (or indeed barely any at any price point, thanks to whimsies of the “current fashion”) and anyway, I’m supposed to be making not buying, I decided to take the plunge on the most tailored item I’ve made yet.

It’s not as if I could hide the tailoring either – if it was bad it was going to look really bad. Fortunately I had a pattern already from one of my magazine subscriptions; New Look K6035.

New Look K6035 pattern

I read through the instructions and decided I could manage it, so next challenge was finding a suitable fabric. A&M Textiles in High Wycombe came up with the goods, a nicely toned navy twill which was structured enough for the garment (with interfacing) but not too heavy bearing in mind I would be wearing this at a fair number of (hopefully sunny) outdoor concerts.

I interfaced all the necessary pieces right at the start so that I didn’t need to interrupt the sewing process. I opted for a lightweight interfacing, which worked well but in hindsight I think it could have taken a heavier weight and resulted in a slightly stiffer structure, especially in the larger areas such as the front facings.

K6035 front princess seam

Construction wise, I was pretty pleased with the princess seamed front panels which were one of the first elements to sew. I managed to get a really neat smooth curve especially with pressing over a ham. The collar was the big and messy bit, all about matching the notches and sewing to very specific points. The instructions also only mention matching dots, when in fact you also need to line up dot, notch, dot – the whole thing would have been much easier if that was more specific!

I found it particularly hard because most of the time I couldn’t see what I was trying to sew, until the later stages when I could partly turn it through and start to see the result. In fact I almost thought I’d gone wrong right at the end, when I couldn’t seem to turn through correctly – until I realized what structure I’d actually made and folded the fabric at the top of the collar. Suddenly everything fell into place!

I did fail to follow one step though – step 12, I stitched the whole edge of the upper collar/facing rather that only between the dots as instructed. This didn’t actually seem to have any negative effect though, and rather seemed to avoid some later hand-stitching of the neck seam under the facing (step 14), which struck me as a bit awkward. Maybe with a heavier fabric it would be necessary to follow the instructions due to the bulk, but in this case it was fine.

I still managed to fudge one lapel notch though, as evidenced by the photo below. But a bit of unpicking and careful 2nd attempt gave a much neater result.

fudged lapelFit wise, I cut a 16 and made only one alteration based on a rough (sleeveless) toile, which was to make a triangular dart-like adjustment of the side seam, taking in at the widest part at the underarm and grading to meet the seam at the waistline. This was to tailor the sides/back some more, as the two back pieces feature a princess seam and so a standard centre-back adjustment wasn’t possible (or as easy). As it turned out, I should have also done some work on the sleeves, as when I tried the jacket on with sleeves, they were much too big at the armhole. I was loathe to unpick the whole sleeve as I had managed quite a neat set-in, and anyway the shoulder and top of the armhole was ok. Instead I pinned out some excess fabric along the sleeve seamline in a wedge shape, with the widest part at the underarm join. I effectively sewed this as a dart, cut away some excess fabric and re-stitched the sleeve back in. It’s worked but next time I will alter the sleeve pattern piece to match. I think I could still have taken a little more from the side seams as well.

K6035 back jacket

new look K6035 jacket

If I were to make this jacket again, these would be my alterations:

– use a slightly heavier weight fabric and/or interfacing; I think this jacket works better with more structure

– recut pattern to improve fit of sleeve and side jacket seams. I was ok with this fit as the purpose of the garment meant I would be wearing it seated with arms raised (for playing the flute) most of the time and therefore a slightly more relaxed fit is ok

– add a button to the front. For the reasons above I left it open but again I think the style suits a button fastening. I may yet change the jacket to add this

– catch stitch the front facings in place. Again I may go back and fix this as I find it annoying that the front facings tend to “catch the wind” as I’m walking along. They are stitched in place at top and bottom so they can’t completely fold out, but the long edge is open and this is what causes the problem.

Tilly and the Buttons “Agnes” Top

So I’ve been a bit remiss in blogging about my sewing (yes, again) but this is the first of a series of posts catching up.

One of the hazards of regular wardrobe analysis and decluttering is realizing that you are short of a certain type of garment but then added to that is the delay when you are aiming to sew rather than buy the replacements!

The Tilly & the Buttons Agnes top was one such item. I decided my wardrobe needed some more “basic but pretty” jersey tops and that it was about time I had a go at sewing with knits. I liked that Agnes has a bit of a vintage flair and that there are lots of options: long or 3/4 sleeves, ruched or plain shoulders, ruched or plain neckline. From one pattern you could style up a whole range of distinguishable tops.

Of course for now I’ve just made the one. But I do have another jersey fabric in stock for version 2. For the first attempt I decided on 3/4 sleeves with all the ruching – no one can say I shy away from a challenge!
The ruching was really the most obviously tricky part of this. I’ve never really sewn with elastic before except for the Sew Over It knickers when I ended up really going overboard with the tension…

I don’t know if I was too cautious but I seemed to have the opposite problem with this, or maybe it was the fabric needed a bit more oomf to pull it in, but anyway when I tackled the bust ruching the first few attempts didn’t really scrunch up that much. I think I had 2 or 3 attempts and then decided I had to live with it as the fabric was getting a bit worked over through all the unpicking and zigzag stitching. The sleeves worked out better so I think it’s just a case of practice practice!

agnes ruched sleeve

I did appreciate the instructions for the ruching. They were very clear and the only method I’ve come across which seemed to have some precision behind it. Basically it involves cutting a specified length of elastic and stretching it on the fabric as you sew with the end of the elastic matching a marked point on the fabric. I think this is supposed to help you avoid over or under stretching the elastic.

The other construction element I had some trouble with was the neckband. But this was mostly because of lack of familiarity of the construction of knit garments and so I couldn’t visualize what it was I was trying to make. However I just followed the instructions through logically and lo the neckband turned out ok. It did take a couple of attempts at pinning evenly before sewing, as the band is smaller than the neck opening in order to pull it in. But you want a smooth finish of course with no gathers or puckering.

agnes neckband

All in all I quite enjoyed knit sewing, certainly there’s very minimal pressing as that is almost ineffective anyway, and no seam finishing. That said, despite using a walking foot the hemline stretched out a bit, and I’m not a fan of the way the raw edges curl up inside the hem. The pattern tips recommend using a knit tape to stabilize the hems but my machine very strongly objected to this, and jammed every time after a few stitches.

Since sewing this top I’ve discovered the overstitch feature of my sewing machine so I think I would either try to use this for hemming, and or stick with zig zag stitch and in either case try to enclose the raw edge inside the hem.

agnestop.jpg

Next Agnes will be coming up very soon I’m sure!

Also I reviewed this pattern on The Fold Line: Certainstyle reviews Agnes on the Fold Line